Tag: monetary collapse

A Closer Look At Bank Bail-Ins And The Black Hole Of Our System

A Closer Look At Bank Bail-Ins And The Black Hole Of Our System

This is exactly what happens every time when a bubble collapses because the cause of the bubble is bank leverage! When the bubble collapses, the leverage is gone but “it exists in a negative sense”: so much more is owed than ever existed in the first place. This is the black hole of the current economic and monetary system.

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David Morgan: Only A Major Crisis Could Force Monetary Reorganization

David Morgan: Only A Major Crisis Could Force Monetary Reorganization

David Morgan thinks there will be no global currency reorganization like Bretton-Woods II before the problem manifests at a level that is a crisis. “My take is that governments are not proactive but reactive. My take, based on history, is that after there is a major crisis, there will be a sort of Bretton-Woods agreement. At that time it could be too late though. There could be so much disruption on a global basis that it might be very hard to get things in order.”

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The Ongoing Depression Could Force A Return To The Gold Standard

| October 19, 2013 | Category: Economy
The Ongoing Depression Could Force A Return To The Gold Standard

This is an excellent interview with Jim Rickards. He explains that we are in a depression currently. The answers to that problem from the US government and central bank will likely force them to impose monetary discipline through the return to a gold standard. The longer the dollar based monetary system is suppressed, the more likely that market forces will induce a dollar collapse. This piece provides deep insights in a complex matter, brought in an easy to understand way.

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Bankrupt Governments Likely To Confiscate Wealth And Independence

Bankrupt Governments Likely To Confiscate Wealth And Independence

Claudio Grass looks at the mess the world is in today and suggests to include a possible crash of the actual system as part of one’s risk assessments. Therefore, an investment into a tangible asset, without having any counterparty-risk, makes absolutely sense. It is impossible to foresee when the system will crash. Inevitable does not necessarily mean imminent. However, “I am convinced that this world will look very different in the coming years and what can be said, too, is that it is not developing in the right direction.”

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Marc Faber Own 25% Of His Assets In Physical Gold

| September 29, 2013 | Category: Investing
Marc Faber Own 25% Of His Assets In Physical Gold

Faber justifies the share of precious metals in his total portfolio: I recommend an asset allocation of about 25% in equities; 25% in fixed income, securities and cash; 25% in real estate; and 25% in precious metals—gold, silver. I think I have around 25% in gold whereby I don’t value my gold. I have it and it’s my insurance policy. It is important that one day when the so-called shit hits the fan you have access to your gold, that it is not taken away.

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Gold – Should You Trust Your Instincts?

Gold – Should You Trust Your Instincts?

With a rising stock market based on cheap credit it’s no wonder that precious metals have taken a hit. Investors move money to where they think they can get the best return. The trouble is that even as stocks are going up and the gold price is hurting, investors and central banks are loading up on gold and silver like never before. There’s a disconnect here. Who is right and who is wrong?

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This Is The Biggest Debt Bubble In History

This Is The Biggest Debt Bubble In History

Excessive monetary stimulus and low interest rates create financial bubbles. This is the biggest debt bubble in history. It is a potent deflationary force and central banks are forced into deploying increasingly aggressive offsetting inflationary forces.

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Jim Rickards: Most Likely Outcome Is Still A Monetary Collapse

Jim Rickards: Most Likely Outcome Is Still A Monetary Collapse

Is it too late to change direction and avoid a collapse? Mr. Rickards believes it is not; we can still avoid it. The key point, however, is that policy makers are not showing signs of understanding the seriousness of the situation and their policy outcomes. They neither show signs of reversing course and solving the underlying structural issues.

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