Tag: bond markets

The First Crack In The Bond Market Is A Fact

Cyprus made us clear that our money on the bank is not our money, it is the bank’s money. Moreover, there is more debt in the world than there are assets to pay, so somebody has to pay for the debts. Those are the key thoughts about Cyprus by Bob Moriarty.

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Unintended Consequences Of The Ongoing Financial Repression

Unintended Consequences Of The Ongoing Financial Repression

Grant Williams explains exactly in which situation we find ourselves today thanks to excessive interventions of governments over the past decade. We have summarized five key take-aways for readers who do not have the time to listen to the whole presentation.

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The Government Debt Situation Japan: A Catastrophe Waiting To Happen

In what we consider a magnificent speech, Kyle Bass explains why he believes the Japanese government debt bubble is explosive in nature. He expects this bubble to burst soon, although he reiterates that it is impossible to know when exactly this will happen.

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Gold Bubble About To Inflate As Government Bond Bubble Ready To Burst

| October 25, 2012 | Articles: Insights
Gold Bubble About To Inflate As Government Bond Bubble Ready To Burst

Grant Williams, author of the economic newsletter Things That Make You Go Hmm who has been working for more than 2 decades in the financial industry, recorded this remarkable video presentation about economic bubbles. In fact, bubbles are very easy to spot because of their valuations that go out-of-control and are not justified by any fundamental measure. Yet almost all people get trapped, every time again, by participating in the frenziness and joining too late. Grant Williams says in his introduction that “Bubbles happen because the vast majority of people can’t see for what they are”. Knowing that the first bubble dates from the 17th century, one should expect at least that the […]

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The Gold Standard Journal of August 2012

This article contains a short summary of the contents of “The Gold Standard Journal” issued on a monthly basis by “The Gold Standard Institute“. Misunderstanding ‘Social’ and ‘Democracy’ and the Abuse of Power (page 2): In this section, the author explains that politicians in Europe and the US are ignoring economic facts only to create an impression that the economy is doing fine. Actually the economy is not at all ok; there are enough facts that prove so. Politicians are (ab)using mass media to keep the focus on wrong facts. Not Orius! (page 5): The author points to the malicious effects of the Keynesian approach. He explains that Keynes his theory did […]

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Why Deflation is the Biggest Catalyst for Precious Metals

Why Deflation is the Biggest Catalyst for Precious Metals

By now, everyone has seen the chart of Homestake Mining and its bull market run from 1924 through 1935. Hence, there is no need to repost it. In this editorial, Frank Barbera shows a handful of charts of gold stocks and gold stock indices during the Depression era. US Gold producers apparently bottomed in 1929 while the Financial Times Gold Index bottomed in 1931. The time to buy the gold stocks was when deflation set in. More recently, the time to buy gold stocks and physical (Gold or Silver) has coincided with fears of deflation. Below is a chart that shows the Google search volume for “deflation.” Predictably, there is a big […]

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Bear-market growl grows louder

Bear-market growl grows louder

The last 24 hours have been brutal for stocks, commodities and the euro, with news that depositors yanked close to €100 billion out of Spanish banks in the first three months of the year – the fastest drawdown since Spanish records began in 1990. The Italian unemployment rate is now above 10%, and European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi is warning that the eurozone is “unsustainable”. US Q1 GDP growth was revised down from 2.2% to 1.9%, emphasising that the US economy is once again slowing, while claims on unemployment benefits increased by 13,000 when economists had expected no increase. To top it all off, data this morning shows UK […]

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